The Blessings & Benefits Of NaNoWriMo

NaNo is nigh! Every November writers from all over the planet hide in home offices and crowd the corner coffee shop to try to write a novel in a month. That is what NaNoWriMo is all about. NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. It is a work of the Office of Letters & Lights based in San Francisco. The challenge is to write 50,000 words in 30 days. I did it last year and loved it. In fact the novel I wrote last November is my third novel, PRINCE, which is scheduled to be launched this November 6th.

Daily Writing

There’re plenty of pluses with NaNo. One is that it helps create or reinforce a daily writing habit, based upon whatever your need may be. There is no way on God’s green earth that anyone can write 50K words without writing every day. Committed writers need to be in the habit of daily writing. If this is not your habit, NaNo may be what you need. If you in fact do write every day, NaNo can bolster this already good practice.

Make Like-Minded Friends

Many towns have Write-Ins, where NaNoers meet usually one night a week and write together. We all like making friends. This is more so if there is some compatibility to jump-start the camaraderie. As a writer I know I like meeting other writers. NaNoWriMo provides a wonderful social component that helps you reach your goal of 50,000 words.

Increase Your Social Media Realm

On the NaNoWriMo homepage you can make buddies with other NaNoers. There is a clear social media component to NaNo. Based upon these buddies, anyone can make Facebook friends, Twitter followers, or even subscribers to a newsletter and readers to a blog. This is especially keen if your blog centers around Creative Writing subjects, like my WFS.

Support For Your Writing

Take all of your new friends you made from the Write-Ins and add them to the buddies you have on the NaNoWriMo webpage and you have a nice circle of friends, all of whom are writers. This can be tapped as a source for review and feedback. This is made easier if you also offer to read their works, too. And this is a potential, not just for his November, but possibly for the rest of your writing career, based upon how well you want to develop any of these relationships.

Forced Organization

No one can succeed in NaNoWriMo by writing from the seat of one’s britches. We must have an organized and systematic structure to our writing life, such as it is. Everything from outlining the plot to fleshing out the characters to scheduling time to write daily to gauging progress requires some sort of orderliness. We can only become better writers from this practice even if the other eleven months of the year we are more free and easy with our composition.

A Sense Of Accomplishment

When you hit the 50,000 word mark, you feel as if you have done something great. Even those who do not reach that mark in 30 days often accomplish a lot and have plenty to feel good about. Anyone who has ever written a novel knows that 50K is not long enough, and whatever you do write n 30 days will need a formidable amount of editing. The work is not done on December 1st. Still, you have you foot in the door up to your knee, at least, and there is light at the end of tunnel. Light at the end of the tunnel? Maybe that’s why NaNoWriMo is administered by the Office of Letters & Lights!

Tell me about you NaNo plans and NaNo experiences in the Comment section below. I can’t wait to see what other people think about this event.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s