Tag Archives: novel writing

“Of All The Gin Joints In All The World:” The Power Of Coincidence In Fiction

rick

One of the most beloved and best quoted movies in the 1942 classic Casablanca. It’s set in the costal Moroccan town during the Second World War. Our hero, Rick Blaine, is an American expat who for runs a nightclub and casino. A Czech leader of the Resistance, Victor Lazlo, comes to Casablanca and to Rick’s place with a woman, Elsa Lund, one with whom Rick shared a romantic past in Paris. They decide to leave when the German Occupation is upon them, but she abandons him at the train station with only a note of goodbye.

The Germans are trying to keep Victor from leaving for America. In the end, Rick helps them escape, even though he sticks out his neck for nobody. He is strongly tempted to disappear with Elsa and leave Victor with the enemy. He nobly sacrifices his happiness for the greater good, the fight against Nazism. One of the most familiar lines comes the night Rick sees Elsa again after the club is closed. He says, “Of all the gin joints in all the world, she had to come into mine.”

It Just So Happens

It is the greatest of coincidences that she had just happened to come with her husband to the club ran by her ex-boyfriend. But the movie would be nothing without that coincidence. It’s not just the arrival of Elsa. There are a series of coincidences that make the story possible. It just so happens that letters of transit were stolen from German couriers, and it just so happens that the thief asks Rick to watch over the letters. Another coincidence is that the thief is shot. Now Rick is in a place to help Victor or himself or no one. The string of coincidences begins long before all of this. It’s coincidence that some time before Victor was a prisoner of the Germans and Elsa thought he was dead, that as a grieving widow she happens to meet and fall for Rick, and finds out Victor is both alive and free just as she is supposed to leave Paris with Rick.

Great storytelling relies on the wonderful power of coincidence and how it connects the dots of the plot. Coincidence arranges for Jay Gatsby to live across the bay from his former girlfriend, Daisy Faye, now Daisy Buchannan. This same coincidence just happens to arrange for her cousin to move in next door to Gatsby, and he uses this to arrange a reacquaintance that steers the rest of the story. Sometimes the coincidence helps with the plot twist. Pip just happens across an escaped prisoner and helps him, and coincidentally he grows rich and becomes Pip’s benefactor. Pip and the reader assume this will help him win Estella, but it doesn’t. She is such a manhater like Mrs. Havisham that Pip is better off without her. And the twist is the help of the benefactor places Pip in a better world with class and status.

Suspension Of Disbelief

The British poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge popularized the idea of the need for a willing suspension of disbelief on the part of any reader of fiction. Without this, the reader constantly exclaims, “That’ll never happen,” and never get around to enjoying the story. Try reading and enjoying “Oedipus Rex” with your skepticism barking as a guard dog at every fantastic occurrence. In genre like Fantasy and Science Fiction, it is clear how the suspension of disbelief is indispensable. But even in more mainstream stories with realistic settings, a willing suspension of disbelief is needful. One place this works is in the story’s reliance upon a heavy use of coincidence to make sure everything happens just as it should.

The Creative Writer needs to be aware that coincidence is necessary for fiction and not be afraid to use it. We can hope that the reader will do their job and chain up the dog. Still, we need to be careful in how we apply the use of circumstance to suit the story. If it’s done in a ham-handed manner it will be a weight to the suspension and help the skepticism poke through. We need to take care to apply the coincidental in a manner that is still believable, something that makes the reader say, “I could see it happening like that.” It needs to resemble the time and chance that happens to us all. If coincidence does not look like the regular occurrence of life that happens to everyone, it’ll be hard to swallow. So when our characters have their own “of all the gin joints” moment in our stories, the reader consoles the character, and says, “I’ve been there before, too, buddy!”

 

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Why Dogs Would Make The Best Novelists

“Everything you need to make a novel takes place at dog height.”  Garrison Keillor

We’ve all heard the bit about a roomful of monkeys at typewriters trying to replicate Shakespeare. The best they ever got was something that looked like “banana,” but that could have been an accident. And I wonder, why monkeys? Why not dogs? I would be much more interested in something written by a dog than some smelly monkey. In fact, I believe that dogs would make great novelists.

Dogs work hard

Dogs are some of the hardest working animals out there. They pull our sleds and rescue us from avalanches. They sniff out drugs and help us when we can’t see. Dogs work almost as hard as novelists. Yes, novel writing is indeed difficult. We sit at a keyboard and type – for hours a day, for months or sometimes years. And that gets us the first draft. Then we go through it again, pushing in and pulling out. I’ll say nothing of the work that goes into finding representation, publication, and notification. Novel writing is hard, and if anything out there could do it, it’ll be a dog.

Dogs come in many breeds

There are a variety of dogs, just as there are a variety of writing genre. Dogs and their breeds are perfect for the different kind of books you see at the bookstore. For example, I would have the German Shepherd write crime novels. Beagles would be great for kids books. Yellow Labs are the most popular breed, so I’d let them write Poplit. I can see Dalmatians writing action stories. And Border Collies can write the literary novels because they are so smart.

Dogs are playful

One thing you just have to admit about dogs, and that is they are playful. They are people pleasers if there ever were such a thing. But shouldn’t that also describe the novelist? Not that a writer should ever write just what they think someone else wants. But we need to be aware of the market, and keep that in mind as we write. Moreover, who are you writing for? Any novelist wants to be read and liked. It seems dogs are perfectly suited for this job, because they are the greatest people pleasers ever. Dogs simply make you feel good, just like a good book should.

Dogs are man’s best friend

From our time in caves and through the rise of civilization, in times of hunting, harvesting, or laboring, the dog has always been man’s best friend. If you love a dog, you live longer, it’s that simple. Dogs are God’s proof in Creation that we are loved and should show love. And as long as man could talk, he’s had something to say. And if it’s really worthwhile, he’ll write it down. In history, the story has also been man’s best friend. Books are valuable and serve a purpose. As with all of the arts, novelists help make the world a better place and contribute to the elevation of humanity. Novelists and dogs are both man’s best friend. In fact if I were a dog, I would want a writer to be my owner because we share so much in common.

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Filed under Creative Writing

Why Dogs Would Make The Best Novelists

“Everything you need to make a novel takes place at dog height.”  Garrison Keillor

We have all heard the bit about a roomful of monkeys at typewriters trying to replicate Shakespeare. The best they ever got was something that looked like “banana,” but that could have been an accident. And I wonder, why monkeys? Why not dogs? I would be much more interested in something written by a dog than some smelly monkey. In fact, I believe that dogs would make great novelists.

Dogs work hard

Dogs are some of the hardest working animals out there. They pull our sleds and rescue us from avalanches. They sniff out drugs and help us when we can’t see. Dogs work almost as hard as novelists. Yes, novel writing is indeed difficult. We sit at a keyboard and type – for hours a day, for months or sometimes years. And that gets us the first draft. Then we go through it again, pushing in and pulling out. I’ll say nothing of the work that goes into finding representation, publication, and notification. Novel writing is hard, and if anything out there could do it, it’ll be a dog.

Dogs come in many breeds

There are a variety of dogs, just as there are a variety of writing genre. Dogs and their breeds are perfect for the different kind of books you see at the bookstore. For example, I would have the German Shepherd write crime novels. Beagles would be great for kids books. Yellow Labs are the most popular breed, so I’d let them write Poplit. I can see Dalmatians writing action stories. And Border Collies can write the literary novels because they are so smart.

Dogs are playful

One thing you just have to admit about dogs, and that is they are playful. They are people pleasers if there ever were such a thing. But shouldn’t that also describe the novelist? Not that a writer should ever write just what they think someone else wants. But we need to be aware of the market, and keep that in mind as we write. Moreover, who are you writing for? Any novelist wants to be read and liked. It seems dogs are perfectly suited for this job, because they are the greatest people pleasers ever. Dogs simply make you feel good, just like a good book should.

Dogs are man’s best friend

From our time in caves and through the rise of civilization, in times of hunting, harvesting, or laboring, the dog has always been man’s best friend. If you love a dog, you live longer, it’s that simple. Dogs are God’s proof in Creation that we are loved and should show love. And as long as man could talk, he’s had something to say. And if it’s really worthwhile, he’ll write it down. In history, the story has also been man’s best friend. Books are valuable and serve a purpose. As with all of the arts, novelists help make the world a better place and contribute to the elevation of humanity. Novelists and dogs are both man’s best friend. In fact if I were a dog, I would want a writer to be my owner because we share so much in common.

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